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STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

AT 

SALEM, MASSACHUSETTS 




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CATALOGUE 
1941—1942 







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Salem State College 
Library Archives 

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Catalog, Day Program. 
1941-1942. C.6. 














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€t)e Commontoealtl) of Ma00actfu$ttt0 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

AT SALEM 



FOUNDED 1854 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



WALTER F. DOWNEY 
Commissioner of Education 



PATRICK J. SULLIVAN 
Director, Division of Elementary and Secondary Education 

and 
State Teachers Colleges 



GEORGE H. VARNEY 

Business Agent 



Members of Advisory Board 

Alexander Brin, 55 Crosby Road, Newton 
Kathryn a. Doyle, 99 Armour Street, New Bedford 
Mrs. Flora Lane, 27 Goldthwait Road, Worcester 
Mrs. Anna M. Power, 15 Ashland Street, Worcester 
Dr. Francis T. Spaulding, 34 Bates Street, Cambridge 
John J. Walsh, 15 Pond View Avenue, Jamaica Plain 



Digitized by tlie Internet Arcliive 

in 2012 witli funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



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STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE AT SALEM 

The State Teachers College at Salem (formerly the State 
Normal School at Salem) was opened to students September 12, 
1854. It was the fourth teachers college established by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Its first building stood at 
the corner of Broad and Summer Streets. This was enlarged 
and improved in 1860, and again in 1871. In the course of time 
facilities became inadequate to meet the increased demand for 
teacher training, and an appropriation was made by the legis- 
lature for a new building, which was first occupied December 2, 
1896. Exactly seventeen years later a modern training school 
was opened and continues to operate today as an integral part 
of the college plant. The site, buildings, and equipment repre- 
sent a value of approximately one million dollars. Every year a 
capacity enrollment of more than five hundred students is 
accommodated. In addition to the president and director of 
training there are twenty-seven members of the college faculty 
and twelve teachers in the training school. 

The campus is at the junction of Loring Avenue and Lafayette 
Street. Salem is on the main line of the eastern division of the 
Boston and Maine Railroad system, connecting with the Saugus 
branch at Lynn. It is also easily accessible by bus. Student 
tickets for both types of service may be purchased at reduced 
rates. 

Salem is the center of many interesting historical associations; 
within easy reach are the scenes of more important and stirring 
events than can be found in any other area of equal size in our 
nation. The surrounding scenery is very attractive. Curious 
and instructive collections may be found which belong to vari- 
ous literary and antiquarian organizations. The churches in the 
city are numerous and represent many religious denominations. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Calendar .... 

Faculty ..... 
Requirements for Admission 
Length op Courses and Degrees 
Expenses . 
Curricula 

Description of Courses 
Student Organizations 
General Information 
Graduating Class — 1941 
Register of Students 



page 
6 

7 

11 

14 

14 

15 

25 

40 

43 

44 

44 



CALENDAR 
1941-1942 



First Semester 

September 3 

September 8, 9 

September 12 

September 15 

October 13 

October 31-November 1 

November 7 

November 11 . 

November 19, 12:25 p.m. to November 24 

December 19, close of day, to January 5 

January 19-23 

January 23 .... . 

Second Semester 

January 26 .... . 

February 23 . 

February 27, close of day, to March 9 

April 3 

April 20 

May 1, close of day, to May 11 

May 29-June 4 

May 30 . 

June 7 . 

June 9 . 

June 10 . 



Training School opens 

P^ntrance examinations 

Orientation Day 

Teachers College opens, 9:30 a.m. 

Columbus Day 

Bridgewater Conference 

Essex County Teachers' Convention 

Armistice Day 

Thanksgiving recess 

Christmas recess 

Mid-year examinations 

Close of first semester 

Second semester begins 
Washington's Birthday 
Winter recess 
Good Friday 
Patriot's Day 
Spring recess 
Final examinations 
Memorial Day 
Baccalaureate 
Class Day 
Commencement 



1942-1943 



First Semester 

September 9 . 

September 11 

September 14 

October 12 

November 6 . 

November 11 . 

November 25, 12:25 p.m., to November 30 

December 18, close of day, to January 4 

January 18-22 .... 

January 22 .... . 

Second Semester 

January 25 

February 22 . 

February 26, close of day, to March 8 

April 19 

April 23 

April 30, close of day, to May 10 

May 28-June 4 

May 31 . 

June 6 

June 8 

June 9 . 



Training School opens 

Orientation Day 

Teachers College opens, 9:30 a.m. 

Columbus Day 

Essex County Teachers' Convention 

Armistice Day 

Thanksgiving recess 

Christmas recess 

Mid-year examinations 

Close of first semester 

Second semester begins 
Washington's Birthday 
Winter recess 
Patriot's Day 
Good Friday 
Spring recess 
Final examinations 
Memorial Day 
Baccalaureate 
Class Day 
Commencement 



Sessions 

College sessions are from 9:30 a.m. to 12:25 p.m., and from 1 :05 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. 
The office is open daily from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to 
12:00 m. When inclement weather makes closing necessary, an announcement to 
that effect is made over Station WNAC at 7:00 a.m., or shortly thereafter. 

Telephones 

College, Salem 375. Training School, Salem 8^. President, Arlington 0671. 

344 



FACULTY 
The Teachers College 



Edward A. Sullivan 

Boston College — B.A., M.A. 



President 



Gertrude Brown Goldsmith . . . . . 

Smith College — B.A. 

State Normal School at Salem — Certificate (One year) 
University of California — M.A. 



Biological Science 



Charles Elmer Doner .... 

Zanerian College — Diploma (Three years) 
Spencerian Commercial School (One year) 
Denison University (One year) 



Handwriting 



Walter George Whitman 
Tufts College — B.A. 
Columbia University — M.A. 



Physical Science 



Verna Belle Flanders ...... 

State Normal School at Salem — Diploma (Two years) 

Certificate (One year) 
University of Chicago — B.S., M.S. 



Geography 



Alexander Hugh Sproul Head of Commercial Department Business Education 
South Dakota State College — B.S., M.S. 



Marie Badger ........ 

State Normal School at Salem — Diploma (Three years) 
State Teachers College at Salem — B.S.Ed. 



Speech, Typewriting 



Florence Barnes Cruttenden 

Mount Holyoke College (Two years) 

]\lt. Holyoko Collogo (Two yoarc) 

New Britain Normal School — Diploma (Two years) 

Columbia University — B.S., M.A. 



Economics, History, Sociology 



Maude Lyman Harris . 
Cornell College — B.A. 
Columbia University — M.A. 



Literature, Speech 



Alice Hayward Edwards 
Tufts College — B.A. 
Hickox School of Shorthand (One year) 
Boston University — M.Ed. 



. Office Training, Shorthand 



Amy Estelle Ware ..... 
Training School, Bangor, Maine (Two years) 
Bates College — B.A. 
Columbia University — M.A. 



Geography 



8 

Caroline Edith Porter .... Literature, Reading, Speech 

Brockpoit Normal School — Diploma (Four years) 
New York University — B.S. 
Columbia University — M.A. 

Mildred Browning Stone ....... Mathematics 

Plymouth Normal School — Diploma (Two years) 
Boston University — B.S.Ed., M.A. 

George Fallows Moody ....... Education 

State Normal School at Fitchburg — Diploma (Two years) 
Boston University — B.S.Ed., M.A. 

MiRA Wallace Physical Education 

Sargent School of Physical Education — Diploma (Three years) 
Boston University — B.S.Ed., M.Ed. 

Lucy Staten Bell ........ Librarian 

Simmons College — B.S. 

Leon Howard Rockwell ...... Education, History 

Mansfield Normal School — Diploma (Three years) 
New York University — B.S. 
Columbia University — M.A. 

Charles Francis Woods . . . . . . . . Music 

Brown University (One year) 

Bryant & Stratton School of Business Administration (One year) 

Boston University — Certificate, Supervisor of Music 

Lillian M. Hoff ........ Special Education 

State Normal School, Trenton — Diploma (Three years) 

Certificate, Special Education 
Columbia University — B.S., M.A. 

Diploma, Special Education 

Elizabeth Roberts . . ... Business Education, English 

Radchffe College — B.A. 
Harvard University — M.Ed. 

L. Gertrude Bunton ........ Education 

Garland Kindergarten Training School — Diploma (Two years) 
Columbia University — B.S., M.A. 

Diplomas (Supervisor, Examiner) 

Florence G. Perry ......... Art 

Mount Holyoke College (Two and one-half years) 
Massachusetts School of Art — Diploma (Four years) 
Columbia University — B.S. ,^^ 

Gertrude Burnham ..... English Composition, Literature 
State Normal School at Fitchburg — Diploma (Four years) 
University of New Hampshire — B.A. 
Columbia University — M.A. 



9 

Edna Mary McGlynn ....... History, Government 

Boston University — B.A., M.A. 
Boston College — Ph.D. 

Lawrence T. Lowrey ...... Logic, Physical Education 

Holy Cross — Ph.B. 

Margaret C. King ....... Physical Education 

Sargent School of Physical Education — Diploma (Three years) 
Boston University — B.S.Ed. 

Richard H. Rockett ..... Commercial Law, French, Latin 
Boston College — B.A. 
Suffolk Law School — LL.B. 
Boston University — M.Ed. 

Boston University — B^S., M.B.A . ^ ^ 

13. J^./^. m't<i, 

Elizabeth Murphy . Accounting, Office Training, Shorthand, Typewriting 

Boston University — B.B.A. 
Boston College — M.Ed. 

The Training School 

George Fallows Moody ........ Director 

State Normal School at Fitchburg — Diploma (Two years) 
Boston University — B.S.Ed., M.A. 

Esther Louise Small ...... Supervisor, Grade Eigh^ 

State Normal School at Salem — Diploma (Two years) 

Elizabeth R. Barlow ...... Supervisor, Grade Seven 

State Normal School at Hyannis — Diploma (Two years) 

State Teachers College at Hyannis — B.S.Ed. 

/*) . ^^ . 
,ge^j,^..g^4,YTTi:5. /^^e Je (n ' p^Uco // ^ Supervisor, Grade Six 

B oaton University B.S.Ed : , M.Ed . , --•/// "^^r-,/H -, 

Mary Lillian Perham ...... Supervisor, Grade Five 

State Normal School at Bridgewater — Diploma (Two years) 

Doris A. Cambridge ...... Supervisor, Grade Four 

State Normal School at Salem — Diploma (Two years) 

Mary Elizabeth James ...... Supervisor, Grade Three 

State Normal School at Salem — Diploma (Two years) 

Mary Foster Wade ...... Supervisor, Grade Two 

State Normal School at Salem — Diploma (Two years) 
State Teachers College at Salem — B.S.Ed. 

Sybil Inez Tucker ...... Supervisor, Grade One 

State Normal School at Fitchburg — Diploma (Four years) 



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ElCHiRG-MCY ESGUIATION 

Entrance requirements have "been tempora^rily modi- 
fied so tlmt any high school gra.duate may he ad- 
mitted to Massachusetts State Teachers Colleges 
after an oral intervie?/ with the president and 
the successful completion of a scholastic aptitude 
test. The test will "be given this year at Salem 
on May 28 and September 10, 1943. 

Students in the upper quarter of the high school 
are eligihle for admission without examination 
provided that they have coraiDleted fifteen units 
and have received passing grades in the seven 
units listed as "Prescribed." 

It is understood tha.t candidates may be fully cer- 
tified for a^dmission in the regalar way and tha.t 
those so certified will not be required to tai^e the 
scholastic aptitude test. 

The regular schedule of subject-matter entrance 
expjnination will be eliminated during the emergency. 



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Ethel Vera Knight ........ Kindergarten 

State Normal School at North Adams — Diploma (Two years) 

Eleanor Elizabeth Walker ....... Special Class 

State Normal School at Salem — Diplorrm, (Two years) 



7 

Viola I. Munyan 

State Normal School at Framingham — B.S.Ed. 
University of Maine — M^^. 5. 



Home Economics 



George William Little ....... Practical Arts 

The Sloyd Training School of Boston — Diploma (Two years) 
Boston University — B.S.Ed. 



Administration 

Ann Keenan Clark ....... 

State Normal School at Salem — Diploma (Three years) 



Registrar 



Maky M. O'Keeffe 

Rhoda S. Polan s ky 

State Teachers College at Salem 

Kathaeine C. Sheehan . 
Tufts CoUege — M.D. 

Arthur W. O'Neil 

Tufts CoUege — M.D. 



B.S.Ed. 



. Secretary 
Clerk 

College Physician 

College Physician 



11 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

I. Application for Admission. Every candidate for admission to a teachers 
college is required to fill out a blank entitled "APPLICATION FOR ADMIS- 
SION TO STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES" and send it to the president. This 
blank may be secured from the principal of the high school or from the teachers 
college and may be filed after January 1 of the year in which the candidate wishes 
to enter. The blank must be filed by June 1 if the candidate desires to be considered 
in the first quota. Applications will be accepted after June 1, but qualified candi- 
dates who apply late will not be considered for admission until after the September 
examinations. 

II. Blanks to be Filed by the High School Principal. The principal of the 
high school is expected to fill out two blanks — one giving the "HIGH SCHOOL 
RECORD" for each year, and the other a "RATING OF PERSONAL CHAR- 
ACTERISTICS" — and send them to the president of the teachers college. 

III. General Qualifications, Every candidate for admission as a regular 
student must meet the following requirements : 

i. Health. The candidate must be in good physical condition and free from 
any disease, infirmity, or other defect which would render him unfit for public 
school teaching. A statement from the family physician and examination by the 
college physician are required evidences of satisfactory health. 

2. High School Graduation. The candidate must be a graduate of a standard 
four-year high school, or have equivalent preparation. 

3. Completion of Fifteen Units of High School Work. The "HIGH SCHOOL 
RECORD" must show the completion of fifteen units accepted by the high 
school in meeting graduation requirements. 

"A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school so 
planned as to constitute approximately one-fourth of a full year of work for a 
pupil of normal ability. To count as a unit, the recitation periods shall aggregate 
approximately 120 sixty-minute hours. Time occupied by shop or laboratory 
work counts one-half as much as time in recitation." 

4. Personal Characteristics. The "RATING OF PERSONAL CHAR- 
ACTERISTICS" and the moral character of the candidate must, in the judg- 
ment of the president of the teachers college, warrant the admission of the 
candidate. 

IV. Scholarship Requirements. Of the 15 units presented for admission, 
12 must be selected from the list given under "2g" of this section and must include 
the 7 units (6 in the commercial department) named in this paragraph as "Pre- 
scribed." (Only 3 English units will be accepted among the required 12.) The 
additional 3 units may consist of any work which the high school accepts in partial 
fulfillment of its graduation requirements. 

Prescribed 7 units 

English 3 units 

American History and Civics 1 unit 

Algebra 1 unit* 

Geometry 1 unit* 

Science 1 unit 

1. Certification. 

a. The privilege of certification is extended to public and private secondary 
schools and academies in the Cortimonwealth of Massachusetts. The teachers 
colleges will accept the certificating grade regularly established by the indi- 
vidual school for college entrance. Units of certification will be determined on 
the same basis as units of credit, subject to the restrictions herein. 

The Department of Education reserves the right to withdraw the privilege 
of certification from any institution when its students fail to measure up to the 
standards required by the Department. The responsibility of the high school 
will continue through the freshman year in the teachers colleges. 

* One unit in any branch of mathematics listed under "2g" is acceptable for admission to the commerical 
department. 



12 



h. Applicants fully certified in 12 units of work (7 "Prescribed," 5 "Limited 
Electives"), and submitting passing grades for 3 additional units ("Free Elec- 
tives"), will be qualified for admission. (In the commercial department the 
distribution is 6 "Prescribed," 6 "Limited Electives," and 3 "Free Electives.") 

Applicants not fully certified in one or more of the prescribed units will be 
examined by subject matter tests prepared by the Department of Education. 

Applicants not fully certified in 5 units (6 in the commercial department) 
under the limited electives group will be required to submit to a comprehensive 
scholastic aptitude test selected by the Department of Education. 

Subject matter and scholastic aptitude tests are given solely to qualify 
applicants for admission. Regardless of the results of these tests, the grades 
submitted by the high schools remain unchanged. 

c. In the case of subjects which continue for two years, the grade for the 
last year must be a certificating grade in order that both units may be accepted 
for certification; if the subjects continue for three or four years, the grade for 
one other year as well as the grade for the last year must be a certificating 
grade in order that 3 or 4 units may be accepted for certification. 

d. Whenever waiting lists are unnecessary, applicants whose grades place 
them scholastically in the first quarter of their graduating class may be con- 
sidered for admission provided they have successfully completed the courses 
in the prescribed units. In the limited electives group, such applicants may 
exceed the maximum number of units in any field, (cf. paragraph "2f".) 

2. Examinations. 

a. Entrance examinations may be taken in June and September in any 
state teachers college. The exact dates are announced in the "Bulletin of 
Information" issued annually by the Department of Education. At the same 
time, students who have completed the third year in a secondary school may 
take preliminary examinations in any of the prescribed subjects except English. 

b. Any candidate who is a graduate of a high school not entitled to certifica- 
tion may be permitted to secure credit toward admission by passing exam- 
inations in the prescribed subjects and by the satisfactory completion of a 
scholastic aptitude test. 

c. In order to equalize opportunity for all applicants, students from high 
schools having a certificating grade of less than B (80%) whose grades satisfy 
the admission requirements may take teachers college entrance examinations 
in the necessary high school subjects for the purpose of improving their scho- 
lastic standing. The high school grades will be changed only if the examination 
grades are higher. 

d. It is understood that candidates are not to present themselves for exam- 
ination in subjects not pursued in secondary school. 

e. College Entrance Board and New York Regents' examination grades may 
be offered for admission. 

/. Units (exclusive of free electives) must be so distributed that the number 
offered in any field, including the prescribed units, shall not be more than the 
following: social studies, 4 units; science, 3 units; foreign language, 5 units (no 
credit accepted for less than 2 units in any one language); mathematics, 3 
units; commercial subjects, 2 units (for admission to commercial department, 
3 units) ; fine and practical arts, 2 units. 

g. Following is the list of subjects acceptable for admission under the re- 
strictions detailed above: 



13 

Max. No. Units 
English in Each Field 

English Literature and Composition (not less than 3 units accepted) 3 

Social Studies 
American History and Civics 
Community Civics 
History to about 1700 
European History since 1700 
Economics 

Problems of Democracy 
Ancient History 
English History 
Medieval and Modern History 
World Geography 

Science 
General Science 1 

Biology, Botany or Zoology 
Chemistry 
Physics 

Physical Geography 
Physiology and Hygiene 
Astronomy 
Geology 

Foreign Language 
Latin 
French 
Spanish 
German 
Itahan 

Mathematics 
Algebra 
Arithmetic 
Geometry 

College Review Mathematics 
Trigonometry 
Solid Geometry 

Commercial Subjects 
Stenography (including Typewriting) i 

Bookkeeping [ 2* 

Commercial Geography 
Commercial Law 

Fine and Practical Arts 
Home Economics 
Manual Training 
Art 
Music 

V. Waiting Lists. If the number of candidates for admission who have ap- 
plied by June 1 is, on July 1, in excess of the number that the facilities of the teachers 
college will accommodate, the scholarship record and the ratings of the personal 
characteristics of all applicants will be evaluated in accordance with the method 
stated below. Qualified candidates will then be admitted in the order of their total 
scores until the allowed quotas have been reached. Waiting lists established on 
July 1 will remain in force until after the September examinations, when new waiting 
lists will be established. 

Scholarship will be allowed 75 points for 15 units of work. Personality will be 
allowed 25 points. As a basis of computing the total score from the scholarship 
record as submitted by the high school principal, a mark of "A" will be given 5 
points; '^B," 4 points; "C," 3 points; ''D," 2 points. As a basis of computing the 
personality record, which includes ten characteristics, a mark of ^'Excellent'' will 
be allowed 2>^ points; "Good," 2 points; "Fair," 1}^ points; "Poor," 1 point. 

* Three units may be accepted for admission to the commercial department. 



14 

PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

Regulations. Beginning with the entering class of 1941-42, promotion and 
graduation will be determined as follows : 

1. A system of quality points will be adopted in all the state teachers colleges. 
Grades will be given the following values: A-4, B-3, C-2, D-L 

2. The number of quality points which a student receives will be determined by 
multiplying the total number of semester hours in the course by the corresponding 
number of quality points, e.g., a six-semester-hour course with a rating of "A" has 
a value of 24 quality points. 

3. The average of the grades required for promotion or graduation will be 2. 
Thus, the work of the first year in the elementary or junior high department carries 
34 semester hours of credit. A student's grades, interpreted in points, must total 
68 in order to obtain the average of 2. Students with an average of less than 2 must 
withdraw from college unless permission to repeat the work of the entire year is 
given by the director on the recommendation of the president for such reasons as 
illness, home difficulties, etc. 

4. Incomplete grades for the first semester must be made up within eight weeks 
after the termination of the course; incomplete grades for the second semester must 
be made up eight weeks after the opening of college. (No course may be marked 
"incomplete" unless 80% of the work has been done at the time of discontinuance.) 

5. The determination of quality points will be made at the end of each college 
year. 

6. E grades can never be removed, but the subjects in which they have been 
received must be repeated and passed before September 1 of the senior year. This 
is to be done in approved sunmier sessions, or, when possible, during the regular 
college year. Continuing subjects in which E grades have been received must 
be successfully repeated before the student may take advanced work. 

7. The grade for a repeated course will be recorded in the college files as "repeated 
and passed with grade of " 

LENGTH OF COURSES AND DEGREES 

The State Teachers College at Salem has four departments which train, respec- 
tively, teachers for elementary grades, teachers for junior high school grades, com- 
mercial teachers, and teachers of mentally handicapped children. 

All under-graduate courses offered are four years in length and lead to the degree 
of bachelor of science in education. 

Graduates of state teachers colleges (formerly known as state normal schools) 
who hold diplomas for 2-, 3-, or 4-year courses may complete their requirements 
for a degree at the State Teachers College at Salem through approved programs of 
extension courses. 

Graduate courses leading to the degree of master of education are offered at 
the state teachers colleges at Bridgewater, Fitchburg, Hyannis, and North Adams. 

EXPENSES 

The following summary indicates as nearly as possible the regular expenses for 
which each student must plan in an annual budget: 

I. Fees for Residents of Massachusetts. 

A. $75.00 a year* — Full-time students 

B. $2.50 a semester hour — Courses for part-time students 

C. $5.00 a semester hour — Extension courses 

XL Fees for Non-Residents of Massachusetts. 

A. $300.00 a year** — Full-time students 

B. $6.00 a semester hour — Extension courses 

III. Textbooks and Supplies. Students are expected to meet the expenses 
of all necessary textbooks and supplies — approximately $35.00 a year. 

* Payable in two installments of $37.50 — one prior to the opening of each semester. 
** Payable in two installments of $150.00 — one prior to the opening of each semester. 




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25 
DESCRIPTIONS OF COURSES 

ACCOUNTING 

Accounting 101 Mr. Hardy 6 sem. hrs. 

Introductory Course Miss Murphy 

A detailed analysis of the bookkeeping cycle, control accounts, adjustments, and 
partnerships. 

Accounting 201 Mr. Hardy 6 sem. hrs. 

Intermediate and Advanced Course Miss Murphy 
A study of principles, including the voucher system, corporations, manufacturing 
accounts, bonds, statement analysis, statement of application of funds, and mergers. 

Accounting 401 Mr. Hardy 2 sem. hrs. 

A Course of Problems Elective 

Advanced problems, including sets, based on va,rious business associations and 
their relation to one another. A portion of the course is devoted to the study of 
teacher examinations in the subject given at different times in various communities. 

Accounting 402 Mr. Hardy 2 sem. hrs. 

Auditing Elective 

The aim is to acquaint the student with the nature of auditing, auditing pro- 
cedures, kinds of audits, and internal check. 

ART 

Art 101 Miss Perry 3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to Art 

A survey course designed to arouse interest in the field of art; to train the powers 
of observation; to develop an understanding and appreciation of the essential art 
principles of line, form, and color; to acquaint the student with the possibilities of 
diverse media; to stimulate and develop creative work through varied art activities. 
Practical problems followed by discussions and criticism lead to ability to use art 
as a means of expression, provide a working vocabulary of terms in common use in 
the field of art, and help to establish standards of judgment and good taste. 

Art 201 Miss Perry 6 sem. hrs. 

Creative Art Activities Elective 

Studio or laboratory work in creative self-expression. A wide variety of media 
and materials is employed — • paper, pencil, chalk, crayon, water color, ink, poster 
paint, alabastine, clay, wood, cloth, wire, cardboard, etc. Opportunity is given for 
group work on large illustrations, scenery, and murals. Art activities are integrated 
with social studies, literature, music, etc. At least one project calling for the mak- 
ing of a miniature model is attempted. Extensive experimentation is carried on in 
design and color. Decorations are planned for pageants, festivals, special assemblies, 
and dances. Exhibitions and window and counter displays are arranged. Modern 
practical problems are stressed. These art activities are pertinent to the experience 
of any elementary or junior high school teacher. 

Art 301 Miss Perry 3 sem. hrs. 

Art Appreciation Elective 

A consideration of all phases of art in everyday life, such as art in personal ap- 
pearance, art in the home, art in the school, art in the community, art in nature, 
art in advertising, and leisure time art hobbies. Modern trends are emphasized. 
With the aid of lantern slides, exhibitions, and demonstrations, the course describes 
how the rapid changes taking place along practical and aesthetic lines have influ- 
enced commercial, industrial, and domestic art. 



26 

BUSINESS 

Business 301 Mr. Rockett 6 sem. hrs. 

Commercial Law 

The history and development of our present day law; the judicial practices of 
court procedure; the unit subjects of contracts, sales, bailments, agency, real estate, 
negotiable instruments, landlord and tenant. 

Business 302 Mr. Hardy 2 sem. hrs. 

Junior Business Training Elective 

A study of the content of junior business training as found in the usual textbook. 
In addition there are readings in current literature on the history, progress, and 
trends of the subject. 

Business 303 Mr. Hardy 2 sem. hrs. 

Business Mathematics Elective 

A thorough analysis of the subject with special emphasis on personal income 
taxes. Students are introduced to more advanced problems, such as true discount, 
sinking funds, and annuities. A knowledge of algebra should prove helpful in this 
course. 

Business 304 Miss Roberts 2 sem. hrs. 

Salesmanship Elective 

An analysis of the fundamentals of retail selling from the point of view of the 
merchant and salesperson. Sales demonstrations are held in class. Stores are visited 
and their sales techniques observed and reported on. Students are encouraged to 
contribute experiences gained during Saturday and vacation employment as sales- 
people. 

Business 305 Miss Roberts 2 sem. hrs. 

Consumer Education Elective 

The customer point of view is emphasized as the student studies such sources of 
merchandise information as advertising, labels, testing laboratories, grades and 
specifications, and the aid offered by the federal and state governments and private 
organizations. A special study of one type of merchandise from the consumer view- 
point is included. 

Business 401 Mr. Hardy 2 sem. hrs. 

Business Organization 

The aim of this course is to give the student an understanding of business, its 
relation to our everyday lives, its procedures, some of its problems and some of its 
major units. Much time is devoted to readings in current literature. Some atten- 
tion is given to money and banking. 



ECONOMICS 

Economics 301 Elective Miss Cruttenden 6 sem. hrs. 

401 Required 3 sem. hrs. (Com'I) 

Principles and Problems of Economics 

An analysis of the underlying principles of the capitalistic system in relation to 
production, distribution, and consumption. Newspapers are used for illustrative 
material. In the longer course, economic principles are applied to modern problems. 
Round-table discussions and research papers are required. 



27 
EDUCATION 

Education 101 Mr. Doner 1 sem. hr. 

Fundamentals of Good Penmanship 

The course aims to develop a proper writing technique, and to acquire skill 
and fluency through study of good letter form, slant, spacing, and relative height 
of letters. 

Education 301 Miss Bunton 2 sem. hrs. 

Advanced Educational Psychology 

The treatment stresses the application of principles of psychology to problems 
of teaching, individual adjustment, and guidance. Among the topics considered are: 
principles of learning, motivation, attention and interest, efficiency of learning, 
transfer of training, study of individual differences, growth and measurement of 
intelligence, mental health, behavior problems, and personality adjustments. 

Education 302 4 sem. hrs. 

Practice Teaching 

For description see Education 402, Elementary and Junior High School Course. 

Education 303 Mr. Moody 2 sem. hrs. 

School Organization and Management 

A course given in conjunction with practice teaching. It considers school records, 
schoolroom materials and equipment, and the interrelationships among pupils, 
teachers, supervisors, and parents. 

Education 304 Miss Stone 4 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Arithmetic in the Elementary School 

Selection, grade placement, organization of subject matter, and teaching pro- 
cedures provide a background for the preparation of units of work for the first six 
grades. 

Education 305 Mr. Doner 1 sem. hr. 

Methods and Blackboard Writing 2 sem. hrs. (Com'l) 

A course in practical blackboard writing in which models and charts are employed 

for the improvement of the student's ability; also a study of the technique of paper 

writing in which standard tests are applied for the measurement of accurate letter 

form, slant, spacing, speed, and quality of line. 

Education 306 Miss Porter 3 sem. hrs. 

Teaching English in the Elementary School 

A study of the methods of teaching oral and written expression; modern tech- 
niques in spelling and reading. Special efforts are made to develop correct reading 
attitudes, habits, and skills, and to prepare for the effective teaching of reading in 
the elementary grades. 

Education 307 Miss Porter 3 sem. hrs. 

Children's Literature 

A course in juvenile literature designed to give a good basis for the appreciation, 
selection, and presentation of suitable materials for the elementary grades. It in- 
cludes an examination and evaluation of new literary materials for children's use 
and an acquaintance with the best illustrators of books for children. 

Education 308 ^ Mrs. King 1 sem. hr. (Com'l) 

Physical Education Miss Wallace % sem. hr. 

A continuation of the work of the second year together with a study of the pro- 
gram of physical education in the elementary, junior high, and senior high schools. 
Opportunity is afforded for practice teaching. 

Education 308A Mr. Lowrey 1 sem. hr. (Com'l) 

Physical Education ^, sem. hr. 

Methods for instruction and participation in a variety of activities and games; 
advanced corrective exercises; further direction in the field of leadership. 



28 

Education 309 Miss Perry 2 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Art in the Junior High School 

The objectives of art education in the modern junior high school. Through actual 
experience in group work, the student gains an understanding of the value of art 
activities in the whole curriculum. Freedom in exploration and creative expression 
under guidance is encouraged. Individual differences and capacities, social situ- 
ations, and vocational art are analyzed. Art integrated with general education is 
developed in unit form. 

Education 310 Miss Bunton 3 sem. hrs. 

Teaching English in the Junior High School 

The first part of the course deals with the problems and opportunities for the 
development of English expression in junior high school. Topics considered: the 
needs, capacities, and interests of pupils in grades VII, VIII, and IX, in respect to 
speaking and writing; motivation and conduct of oral and written composition; 
language usage, grammar and other technical aspects of expression; study of pupils' 
writing, and examination of courses of study. The second part deals with the under- 
standing and appreciation of the expression of others through a study of the nature 
of reading; diagnosis and remedial treatment of difficulties, methods, and materials 
of instruction for improvement of the reading of junior high school pupils. 

Education 311 Miss Stone 4 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Mathematics in the Junior High School 

The place of arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. Selection of content and teach- 
ing procedures are supplemented by an acquaintance with research in this field. 

Education 312 Miss Roberts 2 sem. hrs. 

Guidance in Education 

The principles and problems of educational and vocational guidance and their 
application in junior and senior high school courses. 

Education 313 Mr. Sproul 2 sem. hrs. 

Principles of Commercial Education 

Types of high school commercial education; underlying philosophies and their 
applications; scope at different school levels; organization of material into subjects, 
courses, curricula; agencies of commercial education; standards; methods and de- 
vices for evaluating classroom achievement. 

Education 401 Mr. Rockwell 3 sem. hrs. 

History and Philosophy of Education 

A synthesis of the history and basic principles of education. These basic prin- 
ciples are drawn from the ideals, institutions, and inventions of the more progressive 
nationalities. Folklore, folkways, and distinguishable levels of culture are exam- 
ined to discover the origin and growth of group life. The various patterns of human 
association in their social, religious, political, and economic aspects are evaluated 
for their contribution to the welfare of individuals and to the general welfare. 
Emphasis is placed on the growth and worth of human personality. 

Education 402 4 sem. hrs. 

Practice Teaching 6 sem. hrs. (Com'l) 

Elementary and Junior High School Course 

Sixteen weeks are spent in the Horace Mann Training School, which is located 
on the campus. The work is divided so that eight weeks come during the junior 
year and eight weeks during the senior year. Opportunity is thus afforded to train 
in two grades. The student begins by observing demonstration lessons given by 
the supervisor. Lesson plans are developed and soon the student is actually teach- 
ing. At first this consists of easy drill work only, but gradually more difficult types 
are attempted. Individual and group conferences, based upon written criticisms 
which the students receive, are held frequently. Each student keeps a register, and 
makes an effort to solve classroom problems without help. 
Commercial Course 

All seniors in the commercial department are assigned to selected public high 
schools for an eight-week period of observation and cadet teaching. They are 
supervised continuously by the regular high school teachers and their work is pe- 
riodically appraised and evaluated by members of the commercial department 
instructional staff. 





TRAINING SCHOOL ENTRANCE 



29 
Special Education Course 

In their senior year, after satisfactory completion of the required junior year of 
practice teaching in the regular grades, students are assigned to special classes in 
Salem and neighboring communities. In the beginning, each student works under 
the direct guidance of the regular teacher, and thus grows to accept responsibility 
for the training of groups of various levels of ability in all phases of the school pro- 
gram. The student plans, presents, and develops units of work for the pupils. 
Frequent conferences are held with the classroom teacher. Proper interpretation 
and use of clinical and school records are learned. Opportunity is afforded for case 
study work, remedial instruction, and practical application of the theory courses in 
psychology and methods. 

Education 403 Mr. Moody 2 sem. hrs. 

Tests and Measurements 

This course deals with tests and measurements from the point of view of the 
classroom teacher. Emphasis is placed upon the need and advantages of objective 
measurements; types of tests; test selection; statistical methods such as finding fre- 
quency distribution, percentile rank, mean, median, mode, quartile, and standard 
deviation; diagnostic advantages; and graphs which may be necessary to give an 
accurate picture of class progress. 

Education 404 Miss Perry 2 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Art in the Elementary School 

An intensive study of the aims and purposes of art education in the modern ele- 
mentary school. Practical problems in design, color, illustration, and craft work 
are planned and carried out. Opportunities are given for developing original units 
of work, and presenting single art lessons. Various methods of motivation, experi- 
mentation, demonstration, discussion, and criticism are considered. Child art is 
studied and evaluated. Emphasis is placed on the need for art in the school as a 
force functioning in the growth of the child and working toward the development of 
a finer public taste in home and community. 

Education 405 Miss Flanders 2 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Geography in the Elementary School 

This course adapts the content of previous geography courses to the work of the 
elementary school. Courses of study for the first six grades are examined and 
evaluated. The best use of tests, reference materials, pictures, and maps is dis- 
cussed. Varied methods of presentation are worked out. 

Education 406 Miss McGlynn 2 sem. hrs. 

Teaching History in the Elementary School 

A practical investigation into the courses of study and the methods of teaching 
history, from the storytelling and holiday celebrations of the lower grades to the 
more mature biographical and problem approaches of the upper grades. A working 
knowledge of world history and of American history is presupposed. 

Education 407 Mr. Woods 2 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Music in the Elementary School 

The theory of school music teaching, with lesson plans for each grade level. 
Practice teaching in the classroom and in the training school. 

Education 408 Mrs. King % sem. hr. (Com'l) 

Physical Education Miss Wallace 3^ sem. hr. 

Individual activities, sports, festivals, and pageants. Special opportunities are 
provided for coaching athletic events. \ 

Education 408 A Mr. Lowrey % sem. hr. (Com'l) 

Physical Education }4, sem. hr. 

Mediums of recreation and physical development suitable for pupils of all ages. 

Education 409 Mr. Lowrey M sem. hr. 

Theory of Physical Education Miss Wallace 

Theory of physical activities for children and early adolescents; specifically, the 
organization of programs, methods of conducting contests, and the general back- 
ground needed to direct a physical education course. 



30 

Education 410 Mr. Lowrey 1 sera. hr. 

Health Education Miss Wallace 

A study of school health education comprising materials, activities, and teaching 
procedures. 

Education 411 Miss Goldsmith 2 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Science in the Elementary School 

Methods of teaching nature material in the elementary grades, sources of ma- 
terial, teaching aids, the development of attitudes, and methods of procedure are 
considered and discussed. 

Education 412 Mr. Rockett 1 sem. hr. 

Extracurricular Activities 

A study of the problems involved in school activities outside the regular cur- 
riculum. An attempt is made to assist the young teacher in planning club programs, 
concerts, entertainments, assemblies, radio and visual projects, and the production 
of scholastic publications. The course deals also with student co-operative councils, 
faculty advisership, and the relation of parent-teacher organizations to school 
administration. 

Education 413 Mr. Whitman 1 sem. hr. 

Visual Education Elective 

A survey of the field of visual aids. Chart and slide making. Practice in the 
operation of various types of projectors. 

Education 414 Mrs. King sem. hrs. 

Coaching Elective 

An intensive study of coaching techniques in the major sports which should 
enable a graduate to teach and coach high school athletics successfully. Several 
class hours are provided during the course for the purpose of developing a personality 
which should make for vocational success. 

Education 414A Mr. Lowrey sem. hrs. 

Coaching Elective 

An examination of the techniques which make for success in coaching athletic 
teams with particular emphasis on the fundamentals of football, baseball, and 
basketball. 

Education 415 Miss Porter 3 sem. hrs. 

Junior High School Literature 

This course is designed to give a basis for the appreciation, selection, and presenta- 
tion of literature suitable for the junior high school. It includes an examination and 
evaluation of modern literary materials. 

Education 416 Miss Ware 2 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Geography in the Junior High School 

A survey is made of textbooks and courses of study. The need of field trips, pic- 
ture studies, graphs, and maps in a junior high school geography program is em- 
phasized. The students organize one major unit of work. 

Education 417 Miss McGlynn 2 sem. hrs. 

Teaching United States History in the Junior High School 

A study is made of various teaching methods designed to create an interest in 
American history and civics among the pupils of the upper grades. It is recognized 
that a knowledge of these subjects will become a constructive and important factor 
in the performance of the duties of citizenship. 

Education 418 Mr. Woods 2 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Music in the Junior High School 

The theory of school music teaching with special attention to junior high school 
problems; integrated units of work; practice teaching in the classroom and in the 
training school. 



31 

Education 419 Mr. Whitman 2 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Science in the Junior High School 

A brief survey of the development of general science in junior high schools. 
Courses of study, texts, workbooks, equipment, and preparation and use of demon- 
stration equipment are important parts of the work. Students formulate quiz and 
test questions. Supplementary materials are considered. 

Education 420 Mr. Rockett 2 sem. hrs. 

Teaching French in the Junior High School Elective 
Modern methods and technique in the teaching of French; readings on modern 
language pedagogy; lectures and discussions; observation of classroom procedure; 
practice teaching. 

Education 421 Mr. Rockett 2 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Latin in the Junior High School Elective 
Methods of teaching Latin in grades VII, VIII, and IX; presentation of particular 
grammatical principles; selection of texts, reference works, and other aids. 

Education 422 Miss Bunton 3 sem. hrs. 

History of Education 

A survey and interpretation of the principal forces and events that have influenced 
modern education from ancient times to the present day. The role of education in 
different periods and in different societies is studied with constant reference to the 
implications for present-day problems in education and society. 

Education 423 Mr. Sproul 3 sem. hrs. 

Statistical Methods, Tests and Measurements 

Elementary statistical procedures; functions of measuring in education; forms of 
measuring; specific tests; uses of results in testing. 

Education 424 Mr. Sproul 4 sem. hrs. 

Principles of Secondary Education 

Aims and objectives of secondary education; types of learning involved; principles 
governing selection of subject matter; textbooks; planning, directing, and learning; 
diagnostic and appraisal testing; classroom activities; teacher's personal equip- 
ment; supervision. 

Education 425 Mr. Hardy 13^ sem. hrs. 

Methods of Teaching Junior Business Training and Bookkeeping 

Emphasis is placed on techniques involving lesson plans, testing, grading,'rand 
remedial teaching. One objective is to accumulate materials and model lesson plans 
of use to a teacher of these subjects. 

Education 426 Miss Ware 13^ sem. hrs. 

Methods of Teaching High School Geography 

A survey of courses taught in high schools; a comparison of high school texts; 
selection of maps; use of current material; lesson planning. 

Education 427 Mr. Doner 1^^ sem. hrs. 

Advanced Course in the Fine Art of Handwriting 

Old English lettering; ornamental and engrosser's script. 

Education 428 Miss Edwards 2 sem. hrs. 

Methods of Teaching Gregg Shorthand Elective 
Designed to acquaint students with textbooks, readers, books of dictationj-ma- 
terial, and prognostic and diagnostic tests; to enable them to work out courses of 
study; and to distinguish between good and bad teaching procedures by the applica- 
tion of certain criteria. 

Education 429 Miss Badger 2 sem. hrs. 

Methods of Teaching Typewriting Elective 
General methods are considered. Texts are examined and criticized. Courses of 
study adapted to different groups of students are planned. 



32 

Education 430 Miss Perry 3 sem. hrs. 

Industrial Arts 

Handwork for students preparing to teacli special classes. The work includes: 
problems in plain and pattern weaving involving various types of looms; simple 
bookbinding; making decorative cover and end papers, portfolios, hinged covers, 
and octavo sewed books; wood and linoleum block printing; designing original 
blocks for textiles, cards, cover papers, etc.; the fundamental principles of modeling 
in clay and their adaptation to schoolroom projects; dyeing; rug making; leather- 
craft ^- tooling, stamping, and lacing; metalcraft (copper, pewter, aluminum, brass, 
and silver); basketry — the use of reed and raffia; gesso; and applied design. 

Education 431 Mr. Little 3 sem. hrs. 

Manual Arts 

Mechanical drawing; benchwork; wood turning; joinery; wood finishing; instruc- 
tion in the use of woodworking machinery; blueprinting; foundry, sheet metal, 
wrought iron and cement work; shoe repairing; brush making; chair caning; simple 
household repair; fundamentals of printing. Also, organization and presentation of 
subject matter for an appropriate course of study in manual arts, including use of 
illustrative material such as pictures, slides, motion pictures, film strips, copying 
devices for patterns and blackboard, and index filing of the sources of materials for 
special classes. 

Education 432 Miss Munyan 3 sem. hrs. 

Domestic Arts 

The study of foods includes the theory and practice of simple food preparation, 
elementary nutrition, meal planning, and table service. The clothing course deals 
with fundamental stitches, elementary construction processes, the use of the sewing 
machine, the use of the commercial pattern, and simple embroidery, knitting, and 
crocheting. 

Education 433 Miss Hoff 6 sem. hrs. 

Psychology of Subnormal Children 

An examination of individual differences; scientific studies of the mentally de- 
ficient; identification; classification; theories and studies of causes; social aspects; 
educational possibilities; development of desirable personalities; maladjusted per- 
sonalities; diagnosis and treatment of behavior deviations; defense reactions of the 
mentally deficient and their recognition and treatment. 

Education 434 Miss Hoff 53^ sem. hrs. 

Special Glass Methods 

Definition of special education; general and specific objectives in the education of 
mentally deficient children; curriculum selection; program making; organization of 
special schools, classes and groups within classes; differentiation according to mental 
levels; integration of special classes with the school as a whole; equipment; ma- 
terials; general procedure; methods in school subjects; diagnosis and remedial 
methods; character building; observation and practice in the training school and 
occasional visits to selected schools elsewhere. 

Education 435 Miss Hoff 43^ sem. hrs. 

Testing 

Theory and development of intelligence tests; knowledge and observation of, and 
some practice in administering, scoring and interpreting individual and group in- 
telligence tests, accomplishment tests, diagnostic tests, tests of social adaptation 
and efficiency, tests of special abilities as related to the problems of special education; 
knowledge and interpretation of statistical data found in current literature in the 
field. 

Education 436 Miss Hoff 13^ sem. hrs. 

Observation Miss Walker 

An opportunity to observe the procedures and techniques studied in Education 
434. Background is enriched by frequent conferences, home visits, and actual teach- 
ing experience in the classroom. 



33 

Education 437 Miss Wallace 13^ sem. hrs. 

Principles of Physical Education and Health Education 

The course comprises: (1) theory of physical education, including diagnosis and 
correction of postural defects, rhythmical activities, motor activities, and games 
for children of various ages and levels of physical and mental ability; (2) theory of 
health education, including health services, health super^'ision, and methods of 
health instruction. 

Education 438 Miss Hoff H sem. hr. 

Correction of Speech Defects 

Identification of various types of speech defects in mentally retarded children; 
general procedures for improvement and correction. 

ENGLISH 

English 101 Miss Burnham 6 sem. hrs. 

Composition and Literature Miss Roberts 

The basis of the course is literature, supplemented by writing. Three types of 
literature are considered: poetry, drama, fiction. The written work consists of out- 
lines, summaries, outline analyses, and themes of varying length. 

English 102 Miss Burnham 6 sem. hrs. 

World Classics Elective 

Books selected from the writings of the world's greatest thinkers, beginning with 
Aristotle, are read in their entirety for the purpose of training the student to think 
clearly and purposefully. Material thus dealt with gives an understanding of the 
history of ideas and forms a background for work in other courses. 

English 201 Miss Burnham 6 sem. hrs. 

Survey of English and Miss Harris 

American Literature 

A study of the literature of England and America in sequences of literary periods. 
Detailed analysis is made of certain types whose thought, idealism, and human 
interest are certain to enrich the cultural and professional background. The course 
comprises outside -reading, oral and written reports, discussions, and lectures. 

English 301 Miss Burnham 4 sem. hrs. 

Advanced Composition Elective 

This course gives training in the arrangement and presentation of expository 
material. Biography and criticism are considered, also narrative and descriptive 
elements. 

English 302 Miss Porter 2 sem. hrs. 

Contemporary Literature Elective 
An attempt is made to furnish a wide appreciative acquaintance with the work of 
contemporary British and American writers. Their literary tendencies form a basis 
of comparison between "the best of the new and the old in literature." 

English 303 Miss Porter 6 sem. hrs. 

Contemporary Literature Elective 
An extensive reading course in the works of the newer and significant writers 
offers the student assistance in the comprehension of environment and the under- 
standing of contemporary life. AttitVides, tendencies, problems, conditions, and 
trends are reflected socially, politically, and culturally in recent literature. Knowl- 
edge of the traditional tastes and standards of the English-speaking people as re- 
vealed in the literature of the past are co-ordinated and unified with the present. 

English 401 Miss Burnham 6 sem. hrs. 

Shakespeare Elective 

A study of the major chronicle plays, comedies, and tragedies, interpreted against 
the background of the Elizabethan Age. Shakespeare is studied as both poet and 
dramatist. 



34 

English 402 Miss Porter 3 sem. hrs. 

Contemporary Literature 

A cross section of contcinponiry literature taken to discover the trends in modern 
draina, poetry, fiction, biograpliy, essays, and magazine literature; an attempt to 
develop criteria for evaluating their place in the reading of today. 

FRENCH 

French 101 Mr. Rockett 6 sem. hrs. 

Grammar, Composition, and Translation Elective 
A review of French grammar in conjunction with oral and written composition; 
reading and classroom discussion of plays and stories. 

French 201 Mr. Rockett 6 sem. hrs. 

Composition, Reading, and Conversation Elective 
Advanced composition based on French texts; dictation and conversation; read- 
ing of modern and classical authors. The course is designed to give the student 
practice in writing and speaking the language and to enable him to read easily and 
absorb the contents of the texts. 

French 301 Mr. Rockett 6 sem. hrs. 

Written and Oral Expression Elective 
A thorough review of French grammar with particular emphasis upon the most 
difficult constructions; drill in the use of idioms; translation of texts dealing with 
French life and customs as well as with the geography and history of France. 

French 401 Mr. Rockett 6 sem. hrs. 

Contemporary French Theater and Novel Elective 4 sem. hrs. (Jr. H.) 
A study of pre-war and post-war tendencies with particular emphasis on plays 
and novels; oral and written reports. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geography 201 Miss Flanders 6 sem. hrs. 

Principles of Geography 4 sem. hrs. (Gom'l) 

A foundation course, prerequisite for advanced study in geography. It deals with 
the earth in space, the mathematical aspects of the globe, and the understanding of 
the climatic regions of the world. Later, the influences of land and water bodies, of 
natural resources, and of location on ways of living are considered. Regions of the 
United States are studied to illustrate how human adjustments are made to certain 
environmental factors. 

Geography 301 Miss Flanders 4 sem. hrs. 

Regional Geography 

This course applies the student's knowledge of geographic relationships to selected 
regions in an effort to discover their dominant environmental factors and human 
activities. Chief emphasis is placed on the United States and Latin America. 

Geography 302 Miss Ware 4 sem. hrs. 

Continental Geography 

Studies are made of the contrasts offered by the continents of Europe and Asia. 
Countries are studied in terms of their economic development and world relations. 

Geography 303 Miss Ware 6 sem. hrs. 

Regional Geography of the Western Hemisphere Elective 
As the Americas offer a wide variety of geographic regions, a detailed study is 
made of the most significant. The emphasis throughout the course is on the United 
States and its relationship with the rest of the hemisphere. 



35 

Geography 304 Required Miss Ware 6 sem. hrs. 

402 Elective 
Economic Geography 

Selected raw materials and foodstuffs are studied in their relation to production, 
manufacturing, and commerce. The development of modern means of trans- 
portation as influenced by geographic factors and as related to world trade is in- 
cluded in the course. Emphasis is on the United States. 

Geography 401 Miss Flanders 6 sem. hrs. 

Continental Geography Elective 

Regional studies of the continents of Europe and Asia. Special reference is made 
to geographic influences on current conditions. Through geographic and economic 
studies of the great empires the relations of Australia and Africa to Europe and 
Asia are emphasized. 

HISTORY 

History 101 Miss McGlynn 6 sem. hrs. 

World History 4 sem. hrs. (Com'l) 

A survey of the civilizations of the world, ancient and modern, eastern and west- 
ern. It emphasizes the social and economic as well as the political, biographical, and 
chronological aspects of world history. 

History 201 Miss McGlynn 3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced United States History Mr. Rockwell 2 sem. hrs. (Com'l) 
The story of our country from the period of discovery to our own time, with 
particular stress upon contemporary social, economic, and political problems. 

History 202 Miss McGlynn 3 sem. hrs. 

United States Constitutional Mr. Rockwell 2 sem. hrs. (Com'l) 

Government 

The origin of the political institutions of the United States; the federal constitu- 
tion and its interpretations; the present structure and functions of the national 
government; the origin and content of the Massachusetts state constitution and the 
structure and functions of the state government; local government and institutions. 

History 401 Miss Cruttenden 6 sem. hrs. 

International Affairs Elective 

An introductory study of the development of constitutionalism, nationalism, 
industrialism, and imperialism in the leading world powers during the late 19th 
and early 20th centuries; a comprehensive study of present international relations; 
round-table discussions and research papers. 

LATIN 

Latin 201 Mr. Rockett 6 sem. hrs. 

Grammar, Composition, and Translation Elective 
A review of Latin grammar and vocabulary; exercises in composition; Cicero's 
Letters, De Senectute, and De Amicitia. 

Latin 301 Mr. Rockett 6 sem. hrs. 

History and Literature Selective 

Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil are studied for their literary value and historical con- 
tent. The various phases of Roman civilization are examined to provide back- 
ground for a teacher of the classics. 

Latin 401 Mr. Rockett 4 sem. hrs. 

Horace and Pliny Elective 

Through the letters of Pliny the student becomes familiar with the life and cus- 
toms of the Romans. Through the Odes of Horace he acquires an appreciation of 
Latin poetry. With the Odes as models, some attempt is made at the composition 
of lyrics. 



36 

LOGIC 
Logic 201 Mr. Lowrey 3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of Minor Logic 

A study of the science of correct thinking; the canons and criteria of right reason- 
ing. Specific personal and educational problems are considered and interpreted 
with a view to guiding the student toward a practical and intimate application of 
logic principles. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics 101 Miss Stone 6 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to College Mathematics Elective 
Development of elementary mathematics; the concepts underlying mathematics; 
the nature of mathematics and its relation to other fields of knowledge. 

Mathematics 201 Miss Stone 6 sem. hrs. 

Social-Economic Arithmetic and Advanced Algebra Elective 
The arithmetic covers the knowledge of banking, insurance, and investment 
needed by the average citizen for personal use. The algebra embraces linear and 
quadratic equations, variations, sequences, mathematical induction, permutations 
and combinations, determinants, complex numbers, and theory of equations. 

Mathematics 301 Miss Stone 6 sem. hrs. 

Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry Elective 
Functions of angles; solution of right and of oblique triangles; general formulae 
and logarithms. The study of Cartesian co-ordinates, straight line, circle, parabola, 
ellipse, hyperbola, polar co-ordinates, transformation of co-ordinates, tangents, and 
normals. ' 

Mathematics 401 Miss Stone 6 sem. hrs. 

History of Mathematics Elective 

In the development of arithmetic, algebra, and geometry, emphasis is placed on 
acquaintance with and preparation of written materials and equipment which 
make for the enrichment of the teaching of elementary mathematics. 

MUSIC 

Music 101 Mr. Woods 3 sem. hrs. 

Nature and Significance of Music 

Review of elementary theory; music appreciation historically and as a listening 
project. 

Music 201 Mr. Woods 6 sem. hrs. 

Human Values in Music Elective 
An examination into the aesthetics of music and its influences upon the peoples 
of various lands and periods. 

Music 301 Mr. Woods 3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of Music in the Elementary School Elective 
Further study of school music; increased familiarity with texts and materials; 
program making for school occasions. 

OFFICE TRAINING 

Office Training 201 Miss Edwards 13^ sem. hrs. 

Filing and Office Machines Miss Murphy 

A beginners' course in the operation of such office machines as duplicators, calcu- 
lators, the dictaphone, the ediphone, etc. A portion of the time is devoted to the 
study and practice of various methods of filing. 

Office Training 301 Miss Edwards 2 sem. hrs. 

Advanced Office Practice Miss Murphy 

Further practice in the operation of office machines; a survey of certain textbooks 
in office training; formulation of courses of study. 



37 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education 101 Mrs. King 1 sem. hr. 

Activities 

A foundation course in all phases of physical education. Special attention is paid 
to individual needs as determined by physical and medical examinations given upon 
admission. Game skills and team games as well as rhythmic activities are stressed. 
Hygiene is an integral part of the course. 

Physical Education lOlA Mr. Lowrey 1 sem. hr. 

Activities 

General gymnasium work including marching tactics, free arm exercises, group 
contests, sports, and games. 

Physical Education 201 Mrs. King 1 sem. hr. 

Activities Miss Wallace 

Emphasis is placed upon activities which are of especial benefit to the student 
and which have a carry-over value into adult recreational life. An effort is made to 
improve skills. Opportunities are provided to develop powers of leadership. 

Physical Education 201A Mr. Lowrey 1 sem. hr. 

Activities 

An intensification of the program of the freshman year with particular stress on 
major sports. Attention is directed toward those qualities which characterize the 
successful teacher of physical education. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology 101 Mr. Rockwell 3 sem. hrs. 

General Psychology 

General characteristics of behavior; hereditary background; individual develop- 
ment; bases of motivation; personal problem^s in motivation; fundamentals of learn- 
ing; conditions of learning; thinking; conditions of efficiency. 

SCIENCE 

Science 101 Miss Goldsmith 4 sem. hrs. 

Biological Science 

The fundamental principles of biology, with special attention to the responses'of 
living forms to their environment, structure and the accompanying functions, means 
of protection, plant and animal associations, variation, progression, and the con- 
servation of valuable and disappearing species. Studies are based upon direct ex- 
perience with living forms in the field or the laboratory. 

Science 102 Mr. Whitman 4 sem. hrs. 

General Science 

A general consideration of the applications of science to the field of industry and 
commerce. 

Science 201 Mr. Whitman 4 sem. hrs. 

Physical Science ^ 

An elementary study of the fundamentals of physical science; the influence of 
chemistry and physics upon practical everyday devices and experiences. 

Science 202 Miss Goldsmith 6 sem. hrs. 

Nature Study Elective 

A course to provide actual contacts with trees, flowers, birds, insects, gardens, 
and any nature forms which may furnish content material for a better appreciation 
of one's own environment. It also serves as a background for the elementary science 
methods course in the senior year. 



38 

Science 301 Mr. Whitman 6 sem. hrs. 

Advanced Physical Science Elective 
A survey of the held of physical science; some advanced work in physics and 
chemistry. Particular attention is devoted to astronomy and geology. 

Science 302 Mr. Whitman 2 sem. hrs. 

Survey of Science 

This course disregards the artificial boundaries of the special sciences. It attempts 
to fill in the gaps in a well-rounded general survey of science. Emphasis is placed 
upon subject matter likely to be useful to a junior high school teacher. 

Science 303, 401 Miss Goldsmith 6 sem. hrs. 

Economic Biology Elective 

The objective is to provide a background of material applicable to teaching in the 
junior high school and to promote discussions of plants and animals important in 
the economic life of the nation. Living forms are studied in their relation to various 
industries, to human welfare, to definite geographical areas, and as factors in the 
development of trade and minor industries. 

Science 402 Mr. Whitman 6 sem. hrs. 

Advanced General Science Elective 
A further consideration of the content of general science; opportunity to par- 
ticipate in industrial excursions; some laboratory practice. Time is devoted to cur- 
rent science and the work of present-day scientists. 

Science 403 Mr. Whitman 2 sem, hrs. 

Practical Science 

An attempt to provide knowledge in elementary science and skill in the prepara- 
tion of equipment and the construction of scientific toys. The work centers around 
such topics as air pressure, ventilation, fire, house heating, use of electricity in the 
home, good lighting, photography, and common machines. Appropriate materials 
and equipment for scientific demonstrations are assembled for carrying out with 
children units of work concerning clothing, foods, transportation, communication, 
rhythmic orchestrations, etc. 

SHORTHAND 

Shorthand 101 Miss Edwards 4 sem. hrs. 

Gregg Shorthand Principles 

A beginners' course in the principles of Gregg shorthand 

Shorthand 201 Miss Edwards 53^ sem, hrs. 

Principles, Dictation, and Miss Murphy 

Transcription 

Advanced study of the principles of Gregg shorthand. Students achieve ability 
to take dictation at the rate of 80 words a minute and to transcribe notes rapidly 
and accurately. 

Shorthand 301 Miss Edwards 23^ sem. hrs. 

Secretarial Technique Miss Murphy 

Further development of ability in taking shorthand notes up to a speed of 100 
words a minute and in transcribing them with speed and accuracy; training in other 
secretarial duties. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 301 Miss Cruttenden 3 sem. hrs. 

Principles and Problems of Sociology 

A study of the social principles which control group life and produce the various 
cultures, to the end that a better understanding may be had of the interrelation- 
ships of individuals and groups. Short research papers are required. 



39 

SPEECH 

Speech 101 Miss Badger 1 sem. hr. 

Fundamentals of Good Speech Miss Harris 

An effort to develop greater efficiency in oral expression by the elimination of 
common speech errors and undesirable mannerisms. The real objective of speech 
training and the basic factors constituting correct speech are first carefully con- 
sidered. The classroom then becomes a laboratory where students are given oppor- 
tunity to improve their speech by corrective drills and by individual presentation 
before the class of various speech assignments, subject to the helpful criticism of the 
group. Whenever necessary, special attention is given to individual cases to bring 
them up to the standard of the class. 

Speech 201 Miss Badger 1 sem. hr. 

Speech Construction and Delivery Miss Roberts 
Planned to provide practical training in the preparation and delivery of various 
types of speeches; to give facility in the organization and presentation of classroom 
material; to eliminate defects in voice and posture; and to develop in the student the 
ability to speak easily, confidently, and forcefully. 

Speech 301 Mr. Hardy 1 sem. hr. 

Parliamentary Law Miss Roberts 

A study of procedure for meetings and assemblies of a temporary or permanent 
nature. Much of the class time is devoted to practice. Some training is given in the 
conduct of group discussions such as those of the forum and the panel. 

Speech 401 Miss Harris 1 sem. hr. 

Dramatics, Debating, and Miss Roberts 3^ sem. hr. (Sp.Ed.) 

Platform Oratory 

An advanced course in literary interpretations, creative dramatics, school pro- 
grams, presentation of literary characters, play reading, practical debate, and plat- 
form work. 

TYPEWRITING 

Typewriting 101 Miss Badger 4 sem. hrs. 

Foundation Course for Beginners 

A course designed to make of each student an accurate touch operator by impart- 
ing a thorough knowledge of the keyboard and of the use of the various parts of the 
machine, and by instruction in rhythmic typewriting. Accuracy tests are given as 
well as exercises of a practical nature. 

Typewriting 201 Miss Badger 3 sem. hrs. 

Typewriting Projects Miss Murphy 

Further development of typing ability. Practical problems are presented, includ- 
ing projects in letter arrangement, literary matter, statistics, legal documents, and 
related office practice. Special attention is given to the development of speed with 
accuracy and to transcription from shorthand notes. 



40 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The Co-operative Council 

jMany matters pertaining to the general welfare of the college are referred for 
consideration to the co-operative council which meets biweekly. This is a demo- 
cratic body, consisting of the president of the college, three members of the faculty, 
and representatives chosen by each of the several classes. The council was organized 
primarily to give students a voice in the management of the institution, and share 
in the responsibility for its success. 

Association of Childhood Education 

This is a branch of the National Association for Childhood Education, and is open 
to all students of the elementary department. Meetings are held once a month on a 
day other than club day. Well-known speakers, activities suitable for the lower 
grades, and trips of educational interest comprise the program. The aim of the 
association is to familiarize students with the opportunities offered by the national 
organization to teachers in service. 

Men's Athletic Association 

The primary object of the men's athletic association is to foster a spirit of fra- 
ternity. Membership is automatic upon payment of the blanket fee regardless of 
whether the individual participates in varsity sports. The association belongs to 
the New England Teachers College Athletic Conference which has organized perma- 
nent basketball and baseball leagues. Supplementing the activities of the varsity 
teams, the men's athletic association sponsors an intramural basketball league to 
determine the college champions. Social affairs include an alumni night and a 
spring banquet which closes the season. 

Women's Athletic Association 

The association conducts all extracurricular sports for women, including such 
activities as soccer, field hockey, basketball, volleyball, soft ball, archery, tennis, 
badminton, and other individual sports. Payment of the blanket fee establishes 
membership in the association. 

The John Burroughs Club 

Appeals to all who are interested in the out-of-doors. Field trips are taken when- 
ever conditions permit and are supplemented by visits to museums, greenhouses, 
and gardens. The winter meetings consist of various types of programs and the 
construction of bird feeders and nesting boxes, the assembling of collections, and 
other kinds of handwork. 

The Camera Club 

The camera club has equipment in its darkrooms for developing films, copying 
pictures, and making contact prints and enlargements. There is opportunity for 
those interested to take activity pictures around the college, to gain experience in 
minican photography, and to become proficient in the use of photoflood and photo- 
flash lamps. Some meetings are devoted to lectures by outside talent and to the 
use of the motion-picture projector. 

College Choir 

The personnel is carefully chosen for singing ability. Regular rehearsals are held. 
Songs are rendered at chapel, at outside concerts, over the radio, etc. Strict rules 
of attendance and scholarship are maintained. The size of the group is limited and 
its membership confined to young women of the student body. 

Girls' Glee Club 

An elective and selective group, meeting each week to rehearse music sung on 
different occasions. Some of the activities are joint concerts with other college 
groups, operettas, college concerts, radio appearances, etc. 



41 

The Conimercial Council 

The commercial council is the executive organization of the students enrolled in 
the commercial department. The members are chosen by election, three from each 
of the four classes. The council takes cognizance of all activities of interest to com- 
mercial students, arranges for special lectures, demonstrations, business exhibits, 
educational movie films, and similar activities. It endeavors to be a functioning 
service club. With the funds it has raised by the selling of candy, it has equipped the 
department with a stereopticon, several filmslide projectors, and a 16 mm. pro- 
jector. It recently purchased a recording phonograph-radio, with which it is planned 
to make a permanent record of outstanding talent and to aid students, especially 
seniors, in improving their speech traits. Further purchases of equipment are being 
planned. The council sponsors the annual banquet of the commercial students. 

Bookclub 

The book club offers all lovers of good reading an opportunity to enjoy the best 
books and to aquire a finer and more flexible background for the appreciation and 
interpretation of our present-day literature. A knowledge of "the best that has 
been thought and said in the world" is essential to "more complete living" and 
general culture. Student participation in discussions, reviews, and various social 
activities helps to make an interesting program for the work of the year. 

Dramatic Club 

An organization to develop student talents. There are opportunities for experi- 
ence in directing, make-up, and stage management. In addition to the bimonthly 
meetings, the annual program includes an initiation banquet to receive freshmen; 
the "Tournament Plays" — a series of three one-act plays, a comedy, a tragedy, 
and a drama; a theater party; a Christmas play; a three-act play; chapel programs; 
and a farewell party. 

International Relations Club 

Open to all students of the cbllege who are interested in studying and discussing 
international situations of current interest. It is sponsored by the Carnegie Founda- 
tion to the extent that it receives books, pamphlets, and bulletins which are avail- 
able not only to club members but to the entire college. In the fall, delegates are 
sent to a regional conference arranged for by the Foundation. Here, together with 
delegates from other colleges, they take part in round-table discussions and attend 
lectures given by outstanding authorities. For the benefit of the student body the 
club provides a lecturer on present-day problems and sponsors talks by foreign 
students. 

The Log 

The college newspaper, published monthly. Offers students an opportunity for 
obtaining experience in news writing. The members of the staff and their advisers 
conduct news classes in the fall for those who desire to join or to prepare for an 
advisership of a school newspaper. The Log is a member of the Scholastic Press 
Association of the Associated Collegiate Press and a charter member of the Asso- 
ciation of Massachusetts Teachers College Publications. 

The Mathematics Club 

Affords academic and social enrichment to its members. Through acquaintance 
with such topics as consumer probleipis, the mathematics of hobbies, and visual 
aids in the fields of mathematics, the student is better prepared for participation in 
home and community life and for the guidance of children in their extracurricular 
activities. At dinners held in November and April, guest speakers bring informa- 
tion about recent trends in the teaching field. 

Pitman Debating Society 

This organization provides opportunity for students to develop their public speak- 
ing abilities through declamation contests and through club, radio, and intercol- 
legiate debates. The emphasis is on widespread participation rather than on inten- 
sive work for a few. 



42 

Sketch Club 

The sketch club is intended for those students who have a particular interest in 
drawing. The varied program of activities includes: outdoor sketching trips, indoor 
sketching of people and still life, field trips to museums and industries using art, and 
talks by professional artists. Members of the club have the additional opportunity 
of exhibiting their work at intervals throughout the year. 

Craft Club 

The craft club offers its members an opportunity to participate in various craft 
activities. This background of elementary handwork is suitable for playgrounds, 
camps, clubs, scout groups, work in special classes, and occupational therapy. The 
program includes: making of decorative papers, bookbinding, block printing, weav- 
ing, leatherwork, metalcraf t, clay modeling, mask making, plaster casting, basketry, 
raffia work, fibre craft, gimp lacing, and beadwork. There also may be work in 
stagecraft, including the making of stage sets with scenery, stage lighting, costume 
designing, and marionette construction. 

Travel Club 

As the name indicates, the club group is interested in travel. Their activities are 
sponsored by the geography department. The year's program includes various 
features, such as trips to local areas of special interest, travel talks often illustrated 
with moving pictures, reviews of current and choice books of travel, discussions 
concerning the value of travel, how to plan and conduct trips, how to visit museums, 
etc. 

Tri-Mu 

A social club for boarding students and residents of Salem and vicinity. It holds 
social meetings once a month in the homes of the students, with occasional picnics 
or theater parties. With money earned through the sale of Christmas cards it has 
started and is helping to augment a recreational book shelf in the library. 




p^ 



O 

O 
O 



43 
GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Massachusetts Program of Teacher Training 

The State Teachers College at Salem is one of ten similar colleges in the Common- 
wealth. It is strictly a professional institution. No person may be admitted or 
retained who does not give reasonable promise of developing into an effi cient teacher. 

Board and Room 

Although the college has no dormitories, it recommends, to students who are 
unable to commute, houses in Salem where board and room may be obtained. The 
regular rate is $8.00 a week. All boarding students are required to live in such ap- 
proved houses. Exceptions to this rule are made only for those whose parents wish 
them to reside with relatives or family friends. The houses meet the following re- 
quirements of the Department of Education: (1) They accept no boarders other 
than students and instructors of the teachers college. (2) The same house does not 
receive both men and women students. (3) The number of students in each house 
is limited to a small group. Those who take our students into their homes must 
assume responsibility for their conduct in the same measure as would be required 
of teachers or matrons in charge of dormitories. 

College Restaurant 

A restaurant is maintained in the building on a nonprofit-making basis. At- 
tractive menus are offered daily at reasonable prices. 

The College Library 

The college library, containing about 13,500 volumes, supplements the instruc- 
tion in the various courses and serves as a reading and study center for the student 
body. Books are accessible during the hours when the college is in session. The 
library provides a well-rounded reference collection, books for recreational reading, 
and subscription to about 120 periodicals. Students may use the library without 
fines or fees. 

Scholarships 

Through the generosity of graduates of the college, several scholarships have been 
established. These are awarded to students on a basis of need. Applications should 
be made to the president after the opening of the college year. The following funds 
are available: 

Susan Marvin Barker Scholarship Fund 

Walter Parker Beckwith Scholarship Fund 

Ella Franklin Carr Memorial Fund 

Alpheus Crosby Memorial Fund 

Ellen Maria Dodge Scholarship Fund 

Richard Edwards Memorial Association Fund 

Daniel Barnard Hagar Memorial Fund 

Harriet Laura Martin Memorial Fund (for graduate study only) 

Amanda Parsons Scholarship Fund 

Pitman Scholarship Fund 

Louise 0. Twombly Scholarship Fund 
At Harvard University four scholarshps are granted, each with an annual value of 
four hundred dollars, for the benefit of students in Harvard College who are gradu- 
ates of any reputable teachers college in the United States. 

State Aid 

The legislature m^akes an annual appropriation ranging from four thousand to six 
thousand dollars to be distributed among worthy teachers college students Vv^ho are 
unable to defray their expenses. The money is apportioned according to the enroll- 
ments in the respective institutions. It should be noted that Salem residents are 
excluded from the benefits of this appropriation. 

National Youth Administration 

A National Youth Administration program is in operation here. Customary 
regulations are in force. The federal government has been very generous, and it is 
usually possible to help every deserving applicant. 

Placement 

The state maintains a central employment bureau for prospective teachers. No 
separate bureaus function at the teachers colleges. However, every reasonable 
effort is made by the administration to secure positions for Salem graduates. 



44 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

GRADUATING CLASS — 1941 

Elementary Department 

Bergman, Esther F. 
Boyle, Grace Catherine . 
Cardinal, Mary Frances 
Curtis, Elizabeth Frances 
Dickson, Ethel Margaret 
Flynn, Lorraine Bernadette 
Forbes, Margaret Rebecca 
Gagnon, Mary Elizabeth Irene 
Gallant, L. Claire Ann . 
Grassi, Solina L. 
Hayman, Miriam Flora . 
Horgan, Mary Elizabeth 
Houston, Helen Thomes 
Johnson, Eleanor Sophia 
Johnson, Phyllis Marie . 
Kay, Virginia Appleton . 
Locke, Miriam Jane 
Lyons, Dorothea Ann 
MacLellan, Josephine Anne 
McAuliffe, Mary Josephine 
Mello, Gloria Leonore 
O'Shea, Margaret Mary 
Packard, Virginia Edith 
Pike, Evelyn Mae . 
Pitts, Phyllis Celeste 
Quimby, Althea Hayes 
Riley, Annabel Diane 
Rovic, Helen Marie 
Ryan, Eleanor Catherine 
Shaughnessy, Barbara Eleanor 
Shepherd, Eva Louise 
Squires, Martha Marie . 
Timms, Alice Doris 
Tuohy, Aloyse Martina . 
Wallace, Marian Elizabeth 
Weinstein, Eleanor 



Anzuoni, Louise Eleanor 
Attridge, James Francis, Jr. 
Beaucage, Robert Prescott 
Chase, Eleanor Pauline . 
Clancy, Richard Thomas 
Colbert, William Montague 
Fossa, Mary Terese 
Herlihy, Jane Moore 
Holbrook, Muriel Hazel . 
Holloran, Julie Ann 
Hughes, Helen Josephine 
Malik, Geneva Julia 
Martin, Helen Marie 
McCarthy, Margaret Frances 
O'Leary, Kathleen Mary 
Pirie, Elizabeth Berenice 
Seigal, Joseph 
Waldron, Lurana Marie . 
Witham, Virginia Elizabeth 



Junior High Department 



Blood, Lillian Catherine 
Brown, Bertha . ^ . 
Caram, Mildred Josephine 
Carroll, Dorothy Ruth . 
Cirioni, Florence Ruth 



Commercial Department 



Stoneham 

Revere 

Woburn 

Saugus 

Amesbury 

Chelsea 

Swampscott 

Marblehead 

Lynn 

Revere 

Rowley 

Chelsea 

Beverly 

Lynn 

Melrose 

Maiden 

Chelsea 

Maiden 

Tewksbury 

Maiden 

Somerville 

Lynn 

Revere 

Chelsea 

Chelsea 

South Essex 

Revere 

Cambridge 

Peabody 

Maiden 

Peabody 

Everett 

Boston 

Revere 

Revere 

Lynn 



Ipswich 

Salem 

Haverhill 

Lynn 

Beverly 

Maiden 

Danvers 

Salem 

East Saugus 

Gloucester 

Medford 

Lynn 

Medford 

West Somerville 

Salem 

Swampscott 

Chelsea 

Beverly 

Revere 



Everett 

Lynn 

Lowell 

Lynn 

Hopedale 



45 



Colocousis, Bessie . 
Connick, Alice Catherine 
Constantinidis, John Costas 
Devine, Helen Faye 
Eynon, Evelyn Seymour 
Eynon, Ruth Parshall 
Fischer, Doris Bertha 
Folan, Edna Mary 
Foley, Elizabeth Mary . 
Garber, Sylvia 
Gibbs, William Towle . 
Heino, Aune Elsie . 
Hill, Louise Josephine 
Hourihan, Eleanor Bernice 
Johnson, Virginia Ada 
Kavanagh, Mildred Alice 
Levin, Elenor 
Madian, Clara 
Mager, Winifred 
Marques, Mary Gilda 
McGarahan, Mary Rita 
Morey, George Malcolm 
Nelson, Evelyn Linnea . 
Patterson, E. Van . 
Pelley, Eva Mary . 
Polansky, Rhoda Shayne 
Rentoumis, Athena 
Reynolds, Ruth Adine . 
Shaw, Marjorie Frances . 
Shosterman, Marye Ruth 
Shumrak, Harold Lonian 
Simpson, Barbara Emily 
Smyrnios, Philip Nickolas 
Spofford, Grace Elizabeth 
Stanley, Marjorie Ellen . 
Tarbox, Marian Ruth 

Special Education Department 

Blanchard, Thelma Arline 
Canter, Nina Beatrice 
Lobacz, Stella Agnes 
Parks, Barbara Claire 
Parks, Daniel E. . 
Preston, Jane Anne 
Preston, Rosamond E. . 
Sheehan, Richard Xavier 
Smith, Maurice Francis . 
Sullivan, Margaret Genevieve 
Taylor, Virginia 
Teed, Esther Frances 



Haverhill 

Lynn 

Lowell 

Somerville 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Woburn 

Cambridge 

Lynn 

Salem 

East Boston 

East Weymouth 

Peabody 

Lynn 

Danvers 

Salem 

Haverhill 

Leominster 

Stoneham 

Lowell 

Gloucester 

Lynn 

Lowell 

Lynn 

Salem 

Salem 

Holyoke 

Billerica 

Lynn 

Lynn 

New Bedford 

Peabody 

Haverhill 

I^awrence 

Lynn 



West Somerville 

Salem 

Wakefield 

West Somerville 

Gloucester 

Salem 

Beverly 

Maiden 

Salem 

Fall River 

Beverly 

Salem 



Carney, Rita Marie 
Chrisomalis, Helen 
Cogswell, Ruth Elizabeth 
Connors, Mary Elizabeth 
DeSimone, Rose Mary 
Driscoll, Andrea Anne 
Farrell, Frances Teresa 
Flynn, Elaine Frances 
Gallant, Annette Ruth 
Gilhooly, Mary Josephine 
Green, Virginia Horton 
Levy, Bessie Karp 
Linden, Virginia Mary 
Moody, Barbara Alice 
Morandi, Norma Mary 



SENIOR CLASS 
Elementary Department 



Peabody 

Lynn 

Wenham 

Danvers 

Lynn 

Somerville 

Amesbury 

Swampscott 

North Andover 

Somerville 

East Lynn 

Salem 

Swampscott 

Swampscott 

Somerville 



4G 



Murphy, Beatrix Adele 
Myers, Mildred Evelyn 
Newell, Lawrence Joseph 
Nissenbaum, Mathilda 
O'kShea, Helen Gertrude 
Pooler, Eleanor Ruth 
Rose, Eleanor Mary 
Sack, Ruth Adele . 
Senger, Irene Eleanor 
Shatz, Rita . 
Stacey, Grace Regina 
Thanos, S. Eva 



Junior High Department 



Bailey, Gertrude Beatrice 
Bailey, Mildred Louise . 
Carey, Marian Rose 
Cloon, Arline Elizabeth . 
Connolly, Catherine Louise 
Crockwell, Charles Leo . 
Dandeneau, Mary Constance 
Dodge, Evelyn Caldwell 
Fargo, Maryalice . 
Friedman, Bernice Doris 
Gagnon, Louise Mary 
Haverty, Marjorie 
Howard, John Christopher, Jr 
Kiley, Mary Claire 
Locke, Herbert Lewis 
Lombard, Ursula Maureen 
Mael, Mildred Evelyn . 
McMullen, Rita Terese . 
McNeil, Anne Frances . 
Melville, Catherine Veronica 
Mrose, Irene Caroline 
O'Halloran, Mary Octavia 
Phelan, Eilleen Patricia . 
Reddy, Thomas F. 
Santilli, Chester William 
Seigal, Morris 
Staples, Barbara Longley 
Teixeira, Marie Evangeline 
Thompson, Miriam Hazel 

Commercial Department 

Allen, Phyllis Gertrude . 
Alvezi, Carolyn Mary 
Anderberg, Alice Hedvig 
Ball, Vernelle 
Bedard, Jeannette E. 
Brown, Mary Frances 
Burke, Elizabeth Harriet 
Coffey, Helen Louise 
Cooper, Grace Mildred . 
Costello, Margaret Gertrude 
Desmond, Josephine Catherine 
Donovan, Elizabeth Pauline 
Finn, Mary Agnes 
Garber, Nancy Lee 
Gerrig, Gladys 
Godfrey, Pearl Marguerite 
Gradone, Michael B., Jr. 
Hallett, Corinne Elizabeth 
Harkins, Barbara Joan 
Hassett, Joan Alice 
Hughes, Barbara E. 
Huttula, Lydia Miriam . 
Hymanson, Nathan 
Janes, Ruth . 



Danvers 

Chelsea 

Maiden 

Somerville 

East Lynn 

Salem 

Somerville 

Lynn 

Danvers 

Revere 

Cambridge 

Gloucester 



Medford 

Lynn 

Marblehead 

Lynn 

Salem 

Medford 

North Andover 

Ipswich 

West Medford 

Beverly 

Beverly 

Salem 

Medford 

Winthrop 

Chelsea 

Ipswich 

Millis 

Medford 

Salem 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Medford 

Salem 

Salem 

Everett 

Chelsea 

Beverly 

Dorchester 

West Newbury 

Whitinsville 

Sandwich 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Salem 

Dorchester 

Forestdale 

West Newbury 

Chelsea 

Wakefield 

Mattapan 

Brighton 

Roxbury 

Lynn 

Chelsea 

Lowell 

Medford 

Canton 

Salem 

Great Barrington 

Fitchburg 

Fitchburg 

Lynn 

Danvers 



47 



Johnson, Elsie Anna 
Kelley, Rita Frances 
Kennis, Frances Anita . 
Keyes, Ruth Gertrude . 
Lane, John E. 
Logan, Sandra Michael . 
LoPorto, Theresa Barbara 
Lynch, Norman Paul 
McKenna, Madeline Ann 
Murray, Marjorie Ford . 
O'Leary, Joseph J. 
Pinder, Mary Elizabeth . 
Reynolds, Norma Kathleen 
Ricciardello, Louise Constance 
Sakrison, Doris Elizabeth 
Seymour, Frances Albertine 
Sieve, Lillian Irene 
Slattery, Esther Josephine 
Smith, Pauline Wilhelmina 
Stanton, William Raypaond 
Sullivan, Charlotte Elizabeth 
Twomey, Mary Alice 
Viens, Raymond J. . 
Wall, Henry J. 
Watson, Mary Lavina 
Weinerman, Beatrice 
Zeppernick, Edna Isabella 

Special Education Department 

Abelson, Lillian 
Brownrigg, Helen Rita . 
Cashman, Mary Josephine 
Donahue, Patricia . 
Hyde, Margaret Elizabeth 
McKeeman, Gordon Butler 
Rice, Vera 

Sullivan, Agnes Gil way . 
Sullivan, Edna Catherine 
Traquair, Margaret Guthrie 



Lowell 

Medford 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Rockport 

Lynn 

Brookline 

Cambridge 

Holyoke 

Salem 

Charlestown 

East Boston 

Newburyport 

East Boston 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Beverly 

Charlestown 

Haverhill 

Cambridge 

Lynn 

Haverhill 

Lynn 

East Lynn 

Lawrence 

Winthrop 



Mattapan 

Cambridge 

Newburyport 

Haverhill 

Melrose 

East Lynn 

Everett 

Princeton 

Cambridge 

Melrose 



Aylward, Alice Louise 
Biggar, Helen Litster 
Bluestein, Marion . 
Buckley, Margaret Mary 
Burwen, Alta Marilyn 
Carbone, Marguerite Theresa 
Cillis, Helen Florence 
Glarkin, Eileen Patricia . 
Connors, Mary Joanna . 
Cybuch, Frances . 
Dalaklis, Mary 
Dewing, Norma Mae 
Donovan, Alice Mary 
Doron, Blanche Marie . 
Eastman, Dorothy Helen 
Edwards, Marjorie Cecelia 
Fahey, Eleanor Margaret 
Flaherty, Barbara . 
Fliegel, Norris Eli . 
Gagnon, Mildred Irene . 
Glass, Muriel Jacqueline 
Hankins, Silvie Mary 
Harding, Dorothy Frances 
Henderson, Shirley Jane 
Joyce, Ruth Theresa 
Kimball, Aileen Ethel 



JUNIOR CLASS 
Elementary Department 



East Boston 

Revere 

Maiden 

Somerville 

Roslindale 

Revere 

Winthrop 

Salem 

Cambridge 

Revere 

Somerville 

Lynn 

Salem 

Salem 

Danvers 

Medford 

Lynn 

Everett 

Beverly 

Salisbury 

Everett 

Everett 

Revere 

Haverhill 

Wakefield 

Lvnn 



48 



Lovett, Mary Frances 
MacGregor, Beth Gray . 
Maclnnes, Barbara Elizabeth 
McKay, Jean Catherine . 
McKerrall, Katherine Mary- 
Milton, Ella Marjorie 
Morson, Edith Annie 
Mulligan, Margaret Anne 
Nestor, Elizabeth . 
O'Brien, Elizabeth 
O'Neil, Daniel Joseph 
Pacifici, Elvira Eleanor . 
Ring, Shirley Bernice 
Rogers, Ruth Lillian 
Sarota, Molly 
Saxe, Sylvia Ruth . 
Scalera, Carmine Marie . 
Shore, Helen S. 
Smith, Natalie Isabelle . 
States, Winnifred Mildred 
Thurlow, Barbara Eunice 
"Welch, Frances Anita 
Welch, Marion Louise 



Capone, John D. . 
Dorr, Mildred F. . 
Francis, Lena 
Gallant, Robert Albert 
Guidara, Nicholas . 
Haley, Patricia Agnes 
Herman, Maurice L. 
Hosker, Francis Montgomery 
Hyland, Gladys Elizabeth 
Keegan, Marie Elizabeth 
Lappas, Charles 
Lospennato, Ledo . 
Maloney, Edward Warren 
Murano, Raymond Salvatore 
Murray, Jean Margreta . 
O'Brien, Jean Ellen 
O'Brien, Katherine Louise 
Plant, Doris Marie 
Scopa, Clementia Louise 
Silver, Myer . 
Slavit, Saul Bertram 
Thistle, Everett G. 
Zetes, Christie Nicholas . 



Junior High Department 



Ahern, Regina Marie 
Alpers, Harriet Rose 
Barry, Robert E. . 
Blacker, Lillian Gertrude 
Conlon, Charles Richard 
Cummings, Helen Patrice 
Dulgarian, Lucy 
Fischer, Constance Doris 
Frame, Dorothy Frances 
Freedland, Estelle . 
Hajinlian, Rosa Lee 
Hancock, Joseph Howard 
Hederson, Helen Marie . 
Kierce, Mary Elizabeth . 
Klubock, Ann Toby 
Langford, Mary Catherine 
Latorella, Angela Josephine 
Lenihan, Madeline Rose 
Machaj, Victoria Anne . 



Commercial Department 



Beverly 

Maiden 

Winthrop 

Marblehead 

Everett 

Newburyport 

Wenham 

Revere 

Medford 

Chelsea 

East Boston 

Somerville 

AUston 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Lawrence 

Revere 

Lynn 

Roxbury 

Hathorne 

Somerville 

Somerville 



Revere 

Haverhill 

North Westport 

Revere 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Chelsea 

Lynn 

Beverly 

Lawrence 

Peabody 

Revere 

Wakefield 

Chelsea 

Swampscott 

Arlington 

South Essex 

Somerville 

Medford 

Revere 

Chelsea 

Everett 

Lynn 

Arlington 

Salem 

Everett 

Roxbury 

East Lynn 

West Roxbury 

Chelmsford 

Salem 

North Andover 

Winthrop 

Chelsea 

Somerville 

Chelsea 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Lynn 

Dorchester 

Somerville 

Ipswich 



49 



McElaney, Mary Madeline 
McGlynn, Claire Priscilla 
McKenney, Gladys Anne 
Murray, Eugene Ignatius 
O'Neil, Claire T. . 
O'Neil, Virginia Geraldine 
O'Shea, John Philip 
Pineault, John Louis, Jr. 
Ribaudo, Vincent John . 
Roberts, Paul Nims 
Sharp, Irene Margaret Louise 
Shomo, Mary Therese 
Sullivan, Barbara Rita . 
Sullivan, Mary Elizabeth 
Tenenbaum, Edward 
Thomas, Christine 
Thomas, Helen 
Thompson, Evelyn Edith 
Welch, William Henry . 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Elementary Department 

Anketell, Elizabeth Gertrude 
Breen, Elizabeth Edwina 
Callahan, Jean Marie 
Constant] ne, Muriel Ruth 
Costello, Kathleen Mary 
DeCotis, Malvina Marie 
Deleo, Frances Elizabeth 
Dillon, Althea Marie 
Donahue, Mary Theresa 
Driscoll, Grace Harriet . 
Enos, Margaret Beamish 
Freni, Antoinette Emelita 
Gayton, Electa M. 
Goldberg, Shirley . 
Hanly, Grace Anne 
Hayes, Louise Ann 
Hurley, Jane R. 
Jackson, Grace Amy 
Kulberg, Anna Judith 
Leavitt, Anna Mae 
Lynch, Phyllis Marie 
Magwood, Ardelle Lois 
Mauriello, Edna Ann 
McCauley, Irene Marie 
Mooney, Marguerite Mary 
Murphy, Mary Theresa . 
Murphy, Rita Margaret 
O'Neil, Robert Emmett Joseph 
Palmieri, Ceciha Marie . 
Quint, Beatrice Gertrude 
Roundy, Marion Elizabeth 
Shrager, Phyllis Arlene . 
Skinner, Dorothy DuRant 
Smith, Etta Marie 
Stacey, Alice Lucile 
Sweeney, Julia Agnes 
Tagariello, Lucy 
Whipple, Jean Marilyn 
Zide, Hilda . 



Clifford, Irene Ann 
Connor, Abigail Kathleen 
Connors, Louise Pauline 
Fredrickson, Elinor Augusta 
Gates, Marion Elizabeth 



Junior High Department 



Charlestown 

Beverly 

Lynn 

Somerville 

Chicopee 

Maiden 

Lynn 

Salem 

East Boston 

Newburyport 

Charlestown 

Lawrence 

Lawrence 

Fall River 

Lynn 

Salem 

Salem 

Lawrence 

Beverly 



Peabody 

Belmont 

East Boston 

Salem 

East Boston 

Danvers 

Everett 

Revere 

Lawrence 

North Andover 

Cambridge 

Cambridge 

Everett 

Mattapan 

Salem 

Saugus 

Wakefield 

Danvers 

Beverly 

Chelsea 

Maiden 

Somerville 

Revere 

Chelsea 

Cambridge 

Arlington 

Somerville 

East Boston 

East Boston 

Cambridge 

Beverly 

Lawrence 

Arlington 

Everett 

Cambridge 

Newburyport 

East Boston 

Beverly 

Lynn 



Charlestown 

Revere 

Salem 

Gloucester 

Chelsea 



50 



Gavin, Mary Katherine 
Hingston, Priscilla Ann 
Izen, Morris . 
Jackman, Marjorie M. 
Kane, llarrj^ Stanley 
Kelley, Margaret Jane 
Kerkorian, Beatrice 
Lovejoy, Lillian liouise 
Madow, Bella Frances 
Maltzman, Charlotte Edith 
McLean, Jean Elizabeth 
Murphy, Elizabeth Claire 
Prescott, Evelyn Elizabeth 
Purciello, Edith 
Richards, Milton 
Shannon, Irene Frances . 
Simon, Margaret 
Singleton, Ann Elizabeth 
Sullivan, Herbert Walter 
Williams, Charlotte Nathalie 
Wolf son, Bernard Benjamin 



Amanti, Natalie Marie . 
Barbrick, Raymond William 
Devir, Mary Jane . 
Donovan, Mary Elizabeth 
Dwyer, Jean Frances 
Estrich, Edith 
Fitzgerald, Robert Edward 
Folsom, John Richard, Jr. 
Fortin, Lawrence Joseph 
Garabedian, Anna Mae . 
Giordano, Margaret Concetta 
Godfrey, Hazel Elizabeth 
Greene, Winifred Helen . 
Hastings, Barbara Frances 
Hughes, Dorothy . 
Kay, Wesley Kendrick , 
Kelly, Marian Theresa . 
LeBlanc, Eva Lillian 
Manning, Alice Roberta 
McCarthy, Katherine Frances 
Moran, Rita Bernadette 
Morrissey, Shirley Ruth 
Mosychuk, Eva 
Mullaney, Carol Patricia 
Noonan, Cecilia Anne 
O'Neil, Alice Patricia 
O'Rourke, Rose Marie 
Osepchuk, Anne Marie 
Royal, Marguerite Ruth 
Ryan, Margaret Louise 
Shea, Paul Albert . 
Smith, Norma Ernestine 
Volk, Edna Esther 
Walsh, Barbara Marie 



Commercial Department 



Bradford 

l^eabody 

Chelsea 

Newburyport 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Newburyport 

Dan vers 

Chelsea 

Chelsea 

Gloucester 

Roxbury 

Lynn 

East Boston 

Lowell 

Maiden 

Boston 

Manchester 

Lawrence 

Wakefield 

Revere 



Lynn 

Salem 

Maiden 

Beverly 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Salem 

Salem 

Somerville 

Marblehead 

Hyde Park 

Watertown 

Clinton 

Westwood 

Gloucester 

Lowell 

Danvers 

Salem 

Winthrop 

Somerville 

South Deerfield 

Lynn 

Somerville 

Lynn 

Lowell 

Cambridge 

Peabody 

Lowell 

Somerville 

Beverly 

Arlington 

Lynn 

Newburyport 



Bergman, Sylvia Maj-Brit 
Boyce, Ruth Eleanor 
Bradford, Rose Teresa 
Carter, Louise Frances 
Cogswell, Norma . 
Constantine, Rosamond Alice 
Cronin, Helen Agnes 
Cucchiara, Stella Mary . 



FRESHMAN CLASS 
Elementary Department 



Manchester 

Swamps cott 

Somerville 

Arlington 

Melrose 

Salem 

Salem 

Everett 



51 



DeStefano, Helen . 
Dooley, Eileen Mary 
Freedman, Eunice . 
Gilligan, Elizabeth Joan 
Graves, Doris Beverly 
Lomasney, Patricia Bernice A. 
Malloy, Mary Margaret 
Marsilii, Jeanette . 
McKerrall, Jean Elizabeth 
O'Connor, Catherine Mary 
Parker, Jeanne "Wright . 
Pepe, Carmella Helen 
Petrocelli, Gloria Carmela 
Reynolds, Mildred Emma 
Roe, Cynthia 
Romeo, Nicoletta Mary 
Sheridan, Ruth Louise 
Sullivan, Martha Jane 
Wolozin, Pearl 



Burgarella, Mary Magdalen 
Crowe, Mabel Virginia . 
Fielding, Margaret Elliot 
Fontana, Marie Yvonne 
Harding, Francis David, Jr. 
Hogan, Irene Marie 
Incampo, Volonta . 
Jezak, Louis John J. 
Kiernan, Louise Justine 
Lynch, Eileen Marie 
M alone, Evelyn Alice 
Maxwell, Barbara Ella 
Moir, Priscilla Janet 
Norton, Barbara Ruth 
Perkins, Natalie Sargent 
Perley, Ruth Winifred 
Rea, Doris 
Sewell, Lucille 
Shea, Jane Patricia 
Slack, Mary Louise 
Stanwood, Patricia Jane 
Tucker, Jean Elizabeth 
Vaznaian, Helen Rose 
Williams, Georgia , 

Albrecht, Mary Barbara 
Benoit, Elsie Marguerite 
Burnett, Marion Theodora 
Carlson, Dorothy Esther 
Colwell, Mary Imelda 
Cryan, Claire Ann 
Dacey, James William 
Dawyskiba, Stella Olga . 
DeCoulos, Elaine Hallas 
Desmond, Alice Louise . 
Deveau, Lorraine Isabella 
Eliopoulos, Christos Elias 
Ferry, Joseph Vincent 
Finn, Helen Gertrude 
Finnerty, Frances Rita . 
Flood, Ann Elisabeth 
Flynn, Marjorie Louise . 
Giordano, Florence Virginia 
Gordon, Vivian Ruth 
Grimes, Ellen Margaret . 
Haggarty, Anne Marie 
Hynes, Mary Jane 



Junior High Department 



Commercial Department 



Somerville 

Salem 

Winthrop 

Salem 

Somerville 

Revere 

Lynn 

Somerville 

Everett 

Arlington 

Danvers 

Boston 

Revere 

Beverly 

Lynn 

Everett 

Lynn 

Peabody 

Gloucester 



Gloucester 

Maiden 

Beverly 

Salem 

Salem 

Chelsea 

Beverly 

Lowell 

Lawrence 

Somerville 

Haverhill 

South Hamilton 

Magnolia 

Maiden 

Essex 

Rowley 

North Andover 

Lawrence 

Salem 

Reading 

Gloucester 

Gloucester 

Medford 

Danvers 



Roslindale 

Southbridge 

Somerville 

Lynn 

Wakefield 

Lynn 

Somerville 

Mattapan 

Peabody 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Lowell 

Arlington 

Roxbury 

Lowell 

Norwood 

Tewksbury 

Marblehead 

Lynn 

Palmer 

South Acton 

Charlestown 



52 



lacono, Lydia Kose 
Jianos, Anita Jireda Patricia 
Johnson, Arlene Frances 
Kenefick, Genevieve Beaufort 
Kilday, Mary Rita 
Litvack, Norma Kosalyn 
Lodi, Ruston Frederick . 
Loehr, Barbara Louise . 
Macklin, Marion Grace . 
McCall, Eleanor Marie . 
McGarahan, Elizabeth Lorraine 
McGillivray, Grace Phyllis 
McGorty, E. Phyllis 
McGuinness, Anna Barbara 
McKeon, Irene M. 
McLaughlin, John Francis 
Mulcahy, Joan Catherine 
Murphy, Anne Josephine 
Parks, James Bernard 
Peterson, Eva Ida M. 
Rapoport, Morris H. 
Rehfuss, Lena Grace 
Richardson, Frances Esther 
Rossi, Richard Gerard 
Sannella, Anthony Edward 
Sheehan, Robert Emmett 
Sheffield, Catherine Rose 
Suomela, Aune Edith 
Tobin, Edward Leo 
Torlone, Dorothy Ann 
Toupence, Irving Paul 
Tynes, Dorothy Edna 
Walsh, Anne Marie 
Whelan, Mildred Killen 
Williams, Catherine Agnes 
Williams, Marguerite Teresa 
Zabrofsky, Dorothy Frances 



East Boston 

Roxbury 

Lowell 

Brookline 

Dorchester 

Lynn 

Somerville 

Pittsfield 

Somerville 

Woburn 

Lowell 

Hyde Park 

Arlington 

Everett 

Marlboro 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Lowell 

Lynn 

Rockport 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Lynn 

Chelsea 

Revere 

Lynn 

Lowell 

Westminster 

Lynn 

Medford 

Adams 

Roxbury 

West Medford 

Lynn 

Salem 

Salem 

Dorchester 



Publication of this Document Approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
2500-10-41-7544.